Mary astell academy 4
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Key Stage Three Curriculum

During key stage three, our pupils follow the National Curriculum structure (adapted where necessary to meet individual/group needs).

We use a variety of literacy and numeracy strategies for key stage three pupils to develop and strengthen their basic skills. Given the nature of our provision, the curriculum is personalised, seeking to differentiate learning based on each pupil’s, rather than whole class,’ needs. This approach is utilised to cater for the diverse range of learning requirements and to support each pupil’s, often significant and complex, behavioural needs. The curriculum subsequently offers differing levels of personalisation to improve progression.

Pupils study the core subjects of English, mathematics, science and IT, which are then complemented by subjects such as humanities, Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (which incorporates Relationships and Sex Education), cultural capital (MLF and music) and

Physical Education. The teaching of subjects beyond the core disciplines allows our key stage three pupils the opportunity to sample the key stage four curriculum and assist with future transitions either into key stage four within our academy, or reintegration into mainstream provision.

Subject Taught

Timetable Allocation

English

Four

Literacy

One

Mathematics

Five

Science

Four

ICT

Two

Humanities

Three

Food Technology

Two (alternating with Technology)

Technology

Two (alternating with Technology)

Physical Education

Two

Art

One

Personal Development (P.S.H.E.)

One

Culture (M.F.L. & Music)

One

Character Education

Three

Behaviours for learning are encouraged at all times through our rewards and sanctions systems. Interpersonal skills development is an integral part of everyday learning, augmented by our Character Education Programme, in partnership with external providers, whereby pupils are supported to experience opportunities with which they are unfamiliar, visiting new surroundings, meeting new people, undertaking challenging tasks, and so challenge themselves. All aspects of our curriculum: academic, via small class size and individual attention, pastoral, in terms of welfare, and character development through experiencing the unfamiliar, assist in building self-confidence in our pupils and thereby develop greater independence, self-management and maturity.